Interventions

Broderick Chow and Ella Parry-Davies introduce this set of interventions onTransnational Physical Cultures – three terms that are by their nature slippery and contested.

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Shadow/Boxing

Robyn Mayol and Ella Parry-Davies’ soundwalk ‘Shadow/Boxing’ takes us on a journey through east London’s Bethnal Green, ghosted by the voices of participants in a Muay Thai-based social care group.

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Leaving a Secret Place

In his performative text ‘Leaving a Secret Place’, Raafat Majzoub explores how to shift through transitions between the competing fictive worlds of the powerful and the marginalised.

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“It’s Your Whole-Ass Body!”

In this interview, Kelechi Okafor – owner of South London dance studio Kelechnekoff – discusses the transnationalism of twerk, anti-racism and black advocacy in fitness, and transformation in physical culture.

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The Dynamic Tensions Physical Culture Show

Broderick Chow presents documentation from The Dynamic Tensions Physical Culture Show, performed at the Anatomy Museum, King’s College London, and explains its intervention into the history of physical culture and fitness.

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Interventions 28.3 (October 2018)

Alongside this special issue on “Feminisms Now”, these online Interventions celebrate the formal and conceptual diversity of both feminist performance and scholarship.

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Reclaiming “Whatever!”: Half Straddle as Exemplar of Contemporary Feminist Theatre

Some of New York company Half Straddle were once students of Gwendolyn Alker; now she takes her current students to see their work. Here she reflects on their ‘gloriously queer’ aesthetics and lineages of feminism.

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“Let me be part of the narrative” – The Schuyler Sisters ‘almost’ feminist?

With its hip-hop aesthetics and colour conscious casting, Lin Manuel Miranda’s Hamilton: An American Musical is an international phenomenon – but, Clare Chandler asks, what agency does it give its female characters?

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Because softness means being careful with one’s self

“Because softness means being careful with one’s self”, an audio work by Jessica Worden, both describes and enacts an aesthetics (and ethics) of softness, vulnerability and care.

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Interventions 28.2

Duška Radosavljević introduces this special issue of CTR Interventions on the controversial European theatre director Oliver Frljić.

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Oliver Frljić interviewed by Duška Radosavljević

Oliver Frljić discusses his early encounters with the theatre in Split and Zagreb, key productions in his oeuvre, and international collaborations.

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Dissensual Politics of Performance

Andrej Mirčev explores the controversy that greeted Our Violence and Your Violence (2016) when it premiered in Split, Croatia, through Jacques Rancière’s concept of dissensus.

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Who’s afraid of Oliver Frljić?

Aljoscha Begrich, dramaturg at Gorki Theater Berlin, reflects on the many Frljić productions and many Frljić’s he has encountered before working on the new Gorki – Alternative für Deutschland.

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Teatr Powszechny: Frljić’s theatre playground

Agnieszka Jakimiak, dramaturg on The Curse, reflects on that production and its controversy, arguing that Frljić’s work attempts to dismantle the complicity of representation with power.

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What on earth is happening in Poland? On Klątwa, protest, and a new regime

Bryce Lease discusses the protests that followed the premiere of Klątwa (The Curse) in Warsaw, in the context of political transformations and firings of artistic directors in Poland.

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Interventions 28.1 (March 2018)

Anna McMullan introduces the set of Interventions published alongside this special issue on Staging Beckett and Contemporary Theatre and Performance Cultures, co-edited with Graham Saunders.

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Incommensurable Corporealities? Touretteshero’s Not I

Derval Tubridy explores questions of neurodiversity and agency in the performance of Beckett’s Not I by Jess Thom of Touretteshero.

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End/Lessness

Jonathan Heron discusses his series of projects with the late Beckett theatre scholar and performer, Rosemary Pountney, and the digital iterations and traces of that collaboration.

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Virtual Play: Beckettian Experiments in Virtual Reality

Nicholas Johnson and Néill O’Dwyer reflect on a series of projects that use virtual reality and other twenty-first century technologies to creatively interpret Beckett’s plays.

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Beckett, Ireland and the Biographical Festival: A Symposium

Reporting on a symposium they co-organised, Trish McTighe and Kathryn White argue that an analysis of festival culture is an important aspect of the consideration of Beckett’s place within contemporary art.

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