We Need to Talk About (How We Talk About) Audiences

Kirsty Sedgman presents a commentary on Tomlin’s Political Dramaturgies and Theatre Spectatorship, engaging with debates and misunderstandings between empirical and theoretical spectatorship research.

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“Let me be part of the narrative” – The Schuyler Sisters ‘almost’ feminist?

With its hip-hop aesthetics and colour conscious casting, Lin Manuel Miranda’s Hamilton: An American Musical is an international phenomenon – but, Clare Chandler asks, what agency does it give its female characters?

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Dissensual Politics of Performance

Andrej Mirčev explores the controversy that greeted Our Violence and Your Violence (2016) when it premiered in Split, Croatia, through Jacques Rancière’s concept of dissensus.

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Who’s afraid of Oliver Frljić?

Aljoscha Begrich, dramaturg at Gorki Theater Berlin, reflects on the many Frljić productions and many Frljić’s he has encountered before working on the new Gorki – Alternative für Deutschland.

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Teatr Powszechny: Frljić’s theatre playground

Agnieszka Jakimiak, dramaturg on The Curse, reflects on that production and its controversy, arguing that Frljić’s work attempts to dismantle the complicity of representation with power.

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What on earth is happening in Poland? On Klątwa, protest, and a new regime

Bryce Lease discusses the protests that followed the premiere of Klątwa (The Curse) in Warsaw, in the context of political transformations and firings of artistic directors in Poland.

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Civic Violence: Grappling with Life in the UK

Broderick D.V. Chow, Melissa Blanco Borelli, Bryce Lease, Royona Mitra, Grant Peterson, Jennifer Parker-Starbuck, and Joshua Abrams reflect on gaining Indefinite Leave to Remain in the UK.

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To Permit Refusal

Emma Cox inverts the liberal terms of the editors’ provocation to construct a powerful response to recent European referenda and increasing cultural permissions of exclusion.

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When Little is Said and Feminism is Done? Simon Stephens, the Critical Blogosphere and Modern Misogyny

Melissa Poll uses this online forum to argue that many criticisms of Stephens’ Three Kingdoms, including the main articles in this special issue, avoid grappling with its ‘modern misogyny’.

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Postmedia Performance

In ‘Postmedia Performance’ Sarah Bay-Cheng offers theatre and performance scholarship a provocation to rethink its approach to making sense of the digital.

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“CONJURORS! CONJURORS!…Who wrote this!”*: Some Reflections on Lanark: A Life in Three Acts

Victoria E. Price offers reflections on the 2015 production of Lanark: A Life in Three Acts, Greig’s adaptation of the 1981 Alasdair Gray novel of postmodern Scottish identity.

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Purchase Power: The Marketing of Performance and its Discursive Effects

To accompany his analysis of why the casting of The Orphan of Zhao became so contested, Ashley Thorpe provides a critique of the marketing of the RSC production.

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Writer or Director? The Case of Martin Crimp

Aleks Sierz, author of The Theatre of Martin Crimp, challenges the binary opposition of writer and director in Crimp’s work.

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Keeping it Real: Stories and the Telling of Stories at the Royal Court

Dan Rebellato teases apart the reputation for realism at the Royal Court, where many of Crimp’s plays have premiered.

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Comment: Sochi 2014

Following on from a special issue of Contemporary Theatre Review on the 2012 London Games, Yana Meerzon and Lynne McCarthy address the cultural politics of the Sochi Olympics.

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